Abstract/Details

Asymmetric T cell division and the self-renewal of specific immunity


2012 2012

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Abstract (summary)

During clonal selection of a T cell in response to infection of a host with an invasive pathogen, the host must respond by producing at least two required and disparate cell populations—one that is responsible for controlling the current infection and another that is required to retain the T cell clone for protection against future insults. This diversity within the T cell response may be generated through the use of asymmetric cell division. How T cells may use asymmetric division and to what extent this molecular process plays a role in adaptive immunity is not well understood. Here we suggest that asymmetric division during the initial T cell response segregates proteins by a unique mechanism that involves unequal degradation of a fate-determinate secondary to polarized segregation of the protein degradation machinery. Furthermore, we provide data to extend the principle of asymmetric division to the memory cell response, suggesting that certain antigen-experienced lymphocytes can re-iteratively undergo this process to generate diversity when once again faced with a pathogenic challenge. Together, these results suggest highly conserved principles of stem-cell biology may be regulating the generation of diversity in the adaptive immune response both during primary and recurrent infection.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Cellular biology;
Developmental biology;
Immunology
Classification
0379: Cellular biology
0758: Developmental biology
0982: Immunology
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences; Health and environmental sciences; Asymmetric T cell division; Asymmetric cell division; Memory t cells; Polarity; Self-renewal of immunity; Stem cells; T-bet
Title
Asymmetric T cell division and the self-renewal of specific immunity
Author
Ciocca, Maria L.
Number of pages
105
Publication year
2012
Degree date
2012
School code
0175
Source
DAI-B 73/09(E), Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781267351067
Advisor
Reiner, Steven L.
Committee member
Koretzky, Gary A.; Orange, Jordan S.; Pear, Warren S.; Speck, Nancy A.
University/institution
University of Pennsylvania
Department
Cell and Molecular Biology
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3508985
ProQuest document ID
1019057311
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/1019057311
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