Abstract/Details

Development of a high pressure optically accessible combustor and shear coaxial injector


2012 2012

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Abstract (summary)

A trend in the last decade in the field of propulsion and rocketry is leaning toward the use of the combination of Liquid Methane and Liquid Oxygen as propellant fuels. This is in contrast with the earlier trend of using Hydrogen systems and toxic hypergolic systems. The Multi-Purpose Optically Accessible Combustor (MOAC) and Shear Coaxial injectors have been developed to investigate injector design and combustion research involving Oxygen and Methane propellants. The MOAC is intended for the experimentation and research of combustion of liquid and gaseous propellants. Development of the MOAC system and versatility to use a number of injector styles is discussed. Development of Shear Coaxial injectors common with Oxygen and Methane systems and geometric influences are discussed as well. Instrumentation critical to obtaining test data for analysis of the thermodynamic properties of both the propellants and the combustion chamber are detailed. Optical instrumentation associated with the MOAC system is thoroughly described to identify the characteristics of the spray and combustion dynamics. Finally, testing parameters will be explained as well as a summary of initial test results concluded from initial testing.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Mechanical engineering
Classification
0548: Mechanical engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences, Ground testing, Methane, PIV, Propulsion
Title
Development of a high pressure optically accessible combustor and shear coaxial injector
Author
Navarro, Christopher David
Number of pages
62
Publication year
2012
Degree date
2012
School code
0459
Source
MAI 51/02M(E), Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781267593528
Advisor
Choudhuri, Ahsan
Committee member
Love, Norman; MacDonald, Eric
University/institution
The University of Texas at El Paso
Department
Mechanical Engin.
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1518228
ProQuest document ID
1112510297
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/1112510297
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