Abstract/Details

Consequences of habitat fragmentation: Connectivity lies in the eye of the beholder


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation was motivated by the problem of pattern and scale in ecology. All chapters present models that aim at predicting species' responses to habitat fragmentation. Chapters differ mainly in the nature of the responses being investigated: spatial variation in abundance, or dispersal. In each chapter, I illustrate how current models can be modified to incorporate species' perception of the landscape. Three sources of bias have been examined here: interspecific variation in (i) ecological neighborhood, (ii) ecological generalization, and (iii) in the response to regional processes. I have deliberately moved away from traditional single-scale, patch-based measures of landscape connectivity. Great emphasis has been placed on the anthropogenic aspect of the landscape, and on the role of the landscape matrix.

Habitat fragmentation is a common feature of most (if not all) biodiversity hotspots. I hope the tools shown here can serve as general approaches to study how species are differentially affected by habitat fragmentation, and to ultimately understand how disturbed landscapes can "filter" natural communities.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Biostatistics;
Ecology
Classification
0308: Biostatistics
0329: Ecology
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences; Conservation biology; Corridors; Fragmentation; Graph theory; Habitat fragmentation; Landscape ecology; Scale; Wildlife corridors
Title
Consequences of habitat fragmentation: Connectivity lies in the eye of the beholder
Author
Sardinha-Pinto, Naiara
Number of pages
115
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0227
Source
DAI-B 69/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549655985
Advisor
Keitt, Timothy H.
University/institution
The University of Texas at Austin
Department
Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3315369
ProQuest document ID
193354719
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/193354719
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