Abstract/Details

Morphological and genetic investigations of Pennsylvania populations of the channel shiner, <i>Notropis wickliffi</i>


2010 2010

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

The channel shiner, Notropis wickliffi, is listed as a vulnerable species in Pennsylvania. Little is known about this species of minnow due to taxonomic confusion with the mimic shiner, N. volucellus . The regional variation in morphology makes it problematic to apply identification characters determined in other studies to Pennsylvania populations. By sequencing the mitochondrial gene, cytochrome b, it was found that N. wickliffi formed a separate phylogenetic clade, while N. volucellus and N. buchanani (ghost shiners) were present in the same clade. Three pigmentation patterns were correlated to the haplotype groups, proving useful in distinguishing between N. wickliffi and N. volucellus from Pennsylvania. Principal component analysis revealed that the morphology of all three species is statistically different. Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci, analyzed with STRUCTURE, showed that hybridization is most likely taking place between both N. wickliffi and N. volucellus and also between N. buchanani and N. volucellus .

Indexing (details)


Subject
Wildlife Conservation;
Genetics;
Systematic
Classification
0284: Wildlife Conservation
0369: Genetics
0423: Systematic
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences; Cytochrome b; Cytonuclear disequilibrium; Hybridization; Melanophore; Microsatellites; Morphology
Title
Morphological and genetic investigations of Pennsylvania populations of the channel shiner, <i>Notropis wickliffi</i>
Author
Dowell, Stephanie A.
Number of pages
190
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0067
Source
MAI 48/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109711943
Advisor
Porter, Brady A.
Committee member
Ludvico, Lisa; Selcer, Kyle
University/institution
Duquesne University
Department
Biological Sciences
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1474902
ProQuest document ID
193637722
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/193637722
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.