Abstract/Details

Observation training: Evaluating a procedure for generating self -rules in the absence of reinforcement


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

To conduct a behavioral analysis of the phenomenon known as Observation Learning, one needs to reconcile the research in that area with currently known principles and concepts of Behavior Analysis. In doing so, it became clear that a repertoire of rule-stating and rule-following may account for research result in that area. A computer-based sorting task and verbal behavior questionnaire were employed to test whether an Observation Training procedure could increase accurate sorting and accurate rule statements with respect to the task in the absence of reinforcement for those responses. Observation Training included ten trials of a data collection task that provided feedback only for accurate data collect responses. Four variations of Observation Training were tested. Results indicate that there were improvements in accuracy in both repertoires as a result of Observation Training. Variability of the results was discussed as an outcome of varying histories of reinforcement for rule stating and rule-following prior to this experiment. Additionally, results indicate that the interaction between the repertoires of rule stating and rule-following can account for results observed in the Observational Learning literature.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Behaviorial sciences
Classification
0384: Behaviorial sciences
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Behavior analysis; Observation training; Observational learning; Rule-governed behavior
Title
Observation training: Evaluating a procedure for generating self -rules in the absence of reinforcement
Author
Johnston, Cristin D.
Number of pages
141
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0139
Source
DAI-B 69/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549696025
Advisor
Hayes, Linda J.
Committee member
Ghezzi, Patrick M.; Hunter, Kenneth W.; Kohlenberg, Barbara; Williams, W. Larry
University/institution
University of Nevada, Reno
Department
Psychology
University location
United States -- Nevada
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3316373
ProQuest document ID
193995784
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/193995784
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