Abstract/Details

Investigating the role of stimulus and goal driven factors in the guidance of eye movements


2007 2008

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Abstract (summary)

Three experiments investigated the influence and timing of various goal- and stimulus-driven factors on the guidance of eye movements in a simple visual search task. Participants were asked to detect the presence of an object of a given color from among various distractor objects that could share either the color or shape of the target object. The contrast of one or more objects was manipulated to investigate the influence of an irrelevant salience cue on the eye movements. A time dependant analysis showed that participants' early eye movements were generally directed towards the upper left object in the display. The analysis further indicated that color then quickly became the primary guiding factor for the eye movements with salience and shape having minimal effects in early processing. Further analyses indicated that shape also influenced eye movement behavior, but largely to cancel eye movements to the target object and to end the trial without an eye movement. These analyses also indicated that shape was only processed when an object was attended because it had the target color. A model was developed and fit to the data of Experiment 1.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Psychology;
Experiments;
Cognitive therapy
Classification
0623: Psychology
0623: Experiments
0633: Cognitive therapy
Identifier / keyword
Psychology, Eye movements, Goal, Stimulus
Title
Investigating the role of stimulus and goal driven factors in the guidance of eye movements
Author
Dahlstrom-Hakki, Ibrahim H.
Number of pages
117
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2008
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 69/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549663683
Advisor
Pollatsek, Alexander
Committee member
Berthier, Neil; Cave, Kyle; Fisher, Donald; Rayner, Keith
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Psychology
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3315490
ProQuest document ID
219984077
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/219984077
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