Abstract/Details

Physiological signs of stress during conflict: The role of attachment style, sexual passion, and love


2007 2008

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Abstract (summary)

The purpose of this study was to investigate how attachment style, sexual passion, and love directly and jointly affect the how the HPA-axis responds to relationship conflict. Cortisol measurements were gathered from 198 dating couples while they discussed a relationship issue that has recently been the source of heated debate. Sexual passion was associated with higher levels of cortisol during the conflict for men but not women. In contrast, being in love and being loved more by a partner were linked to lower levels of cortisol during the moment of conflict for both men and women. The hypothesis that cortisol levels during conflict further depend on the interaction between sexual passion, love and a person's attachment style received some support. Females high in sexual passion and attachment anxiety experienced a faster increase in cortisol in anticipation of conflict, and females high in love and avoidance displayed a slower increase in cortisol during conflict. The discussion also focuses on the role that cortisol appears to play in conflict related attachment processes.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social psychology;
Psychotherapy
Classification
0451: Social psychology
0622: Psychotherapy
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Attachment style; Conflict; Cortisol; Love; Passion; Sex; Stress
Title
Physiological signs of stress during conflict: The role of attachment style, sexual passion, and love
Author
Vernon, Michael L.
Number of pages
104
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2008
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 69/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549663751
Advisor
Pietromonaco, Paula R.
Committee member
Gerstel, Naomi; Janoff-Bulman, Ronnie; Powers, Sally I.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Psychology
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3315497
ProQuest document ID
219984870
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/219984870
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