Abstract/Details

He puke mele lāhui: Nā mele Kūpa'a, nā mele kū'ē a me nā mele aloha o nā kānaka maoli


2002 2002

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Abstract (summary)

Following the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom in 1893, Kānaka Maoli composed numerous mele lāhui in commemoration of the events. These mele were published in Hawaiian language newspapers, the place where Kānaka Maoli reported the events of their time as well as their opinion about those events. Through the mele lāhui which they composed and published, the Kānaka Maoli reported the historical details of the overthrow and the period following. In the mele are recorded the people's loyalty to their nation, along with their resistance and protest to the abuse of their rights to independence. The composers use language of insult and disparagement in their portrayals and descriptions of those who played vital roles in the overthrow. There are also many mele which are prayers and request the assistance and the blessings of Hawaiians Gods as well as the Christian God. In addition, there are even more mele whose main purpose and theme are expressions of aloha for the Hawaiian Kingdom, the Native people, and their Queen. From that time until today, Kānaka Maoli have continued to compose mele as expressions of our lives and our history, as protest against the continued dominance and subjugation of our people, and as admiration for the loyal and steadfast support of the rights of our land and our people.

Indexing (details)


Subject
History;
American history
Classification
0332: History
0337: American history
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences, Hawaiian and English text
Title
He puke mele lāhui: Nā mele Kūpa'a, nā mele kū'ē a me nā mele aloha o nā kānaka maoli
Author
Basham, Jennifer J. Leilani
Number of pages
184
Publication year
2002
Degree date
2002
School code
0085
Source
MAI 41/03M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780493905501, 0493905502
Advisor
Hanlon, David
University/institution
University of Hawai'i at Manoa
University location
United States -- Hawaii
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English, Hawaiian
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1411502
ProQuest document ID
238131564
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/238131564
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