Abstract/Details

The absence of African American male superintendents in white suburban school districts


2002 2002

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Abstract (summary)

This research examines the reasons why so few African American males are hired as superintendents in suburban white districts on Long Island, New York. The literature review summarizes the paucity of evidence available on African American males in the superintendency. The study combines qualitative and quantitative research methods. The research is based on critical race theory (CRT). The 3-phase study surveys those who recruit and hire superintendents, gathers data on the kinds of districts to which African American males are applying to; and records the search stories of African American males seeking superintendencies. The evidence indicates that African American males are underrepresented in the superintendent search process. CRT provides a theoretical framework establishing racism as a major hurdle preventing African American males from obtaining superintendencies in white districts. It is possible that the lack of opportunities may lead to an exodus of valuable human talent.

Indexing (details)


Subject
School administration;
African Americans;
Minority & ethnic groups;
Sociology
Classification
0514: School administration
0325: African Americans
0631: Minority & ethnic groups
0631: Sociology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences, Education, African-American, Suburban school districts, Superintendents, White school districts
Title
The absence of African American male superintendents in white suburban school districts
Author
Jackson, Jerry Lee
Number of pages
198
Publication year
2002
Degree date
2002
School code
0086
Source
DAI-A 63/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780493725321, 0493725326
University/institution
Hofstra University
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
Ed.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3057260
ProQuest document ID
275995734
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/275995734
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