Abstract/Details

A study of minimum competency exams and earning a secondary school credential


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

For over thirty years, states have been implementing minimum competency exam (MCE) requirements, mandating that high school students demonstrate a basic level of proficiency before they are allowed to graduate. Despite concerns that these exams may have unintended consequences for low-performing students and students with low family income, twenty-five states currently require students to pass a MCE to graduate. This study evaluates the relationship between minimum competency exam requirements and secondary school completion using a nationally representative sample taken from the 1994 data collection of the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 and a logistic regression model. The results indicate that MCEs are associated with an increase in the likelihood of dropping out for students with low family income.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Educational tests & measurements;
Secondary education;
Public policy
Classification
0288: Educational tests & measurements
0533: Secondary education
0630: Public policy
Identifier / keyword
Education; Social sciences; Diploma; Dropout; Education; High school exit exam; K-12; Minimum competency exam
Title
A study of minimum competency exams and earning a secondary school credential
Author
Rasberry, Brent
Number of pages
45
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0076
Source
MAI 48/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109734553
Advisor
LoGerfo, Laura
University/institution
Georgetown University
Department
Public Policy & Policy Management
University location
United States -- District of Columbia
Degree
M.P.P.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1475337
ProQuest document ID
276345542
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/276345542
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