Abstract/Details

The conflict between cultic sacrifice and prophetic obedience in Psalm 40


1985 1985

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Abstract (summary)

The thesis explores the apparent conflict between the prophetic call to inwardness and the priestly demand for sacrifice. This polemic is quoted by some theologians as clear support in scripture for the various hypotheses upon which the exegeses of "higher criticism" of the Old Testament are based.

The thesis examines the supposed polemic by focusing attention, first, on Psalm 40:6–8, one of the clearest statements cited in support of the conflict. An exegesis of the text is made and the meaning of Hebrew sacrifice is explored. Secondly, an analysis is made of statements by Samuel, Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Micah, and Jeremiah which appear to support the assumed conflict.

The thesis concludes, upon a closer examination of Psalm 40:6–8, that no conflict exists between prophet and priest. What is called for in each case is not an either/or choice between obedience and sacrifice, but a re-interpretation of both in the light of the hesed of the coming Messiah.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Biblical studies
Classification
0321: Biblical studies
Identifier / keyword
Philosophy, religion and theology
Title
The conflict between cultic sacrifice and prophetic obedience in Psalm 40
Author
Lewis, Bob D.
Number of pages
102
Publication year
1985
Degree date
1985
School code
1535
Source
MAI 47/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549751304
University/institution
Amridge University
University location
United States -- Alabama
Degree
M.Th.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
EP25780
ProQuest document ID
303449102
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/303449102
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