Abstract/Details

To determine the effect of neutral pelvic alignment on postural tonus in the adductor muscle group in cerebral palsy


1988 1988

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Abstract (summary)

The purpose of this study was to determine if neutral pelvic alignment of children with spastic cerebral palsy reduced myoelectric activity in the adductor muscle group in the sitting position. This study used eight children in a one-group pre-test/post-test design to compare the myoelectric activity of the hip adductors via surface electrodes for two pelvic positions. Recordings for each child were taken using a Relax Pac biofeedback monitor after sitting in each position for thirty seconds, five minutes, and ten minutes. The usual posture of these eight children included a posteriorly tilted pelvis and increased kyphosis with increased muscle tone in the lower extremities. Sitting in this position in a Rifton Toddler Chair was used as the pre-test position. The treatment position tested was with the pelvis held in neutral alignment by a pelvic cross strap device.

Based on results of the Distribution-Free Signed Rank Test (Wilcoxon), it was concluded that a significant reduction in myoelectric activity occurred when the child was positioned with the pelvis in neutral alignment and maintained with a pelvic positioning device. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Indexing (details)


Subject
Rehabilitation;
Therapy
Classification
0382: Rehabilitation
0382: Therapy
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences
Title
To determine the effect of neutral pelvic alignment on postural tonus in the adductor muscle group in cerebral palsy
Author
Messina, Karen
Number of pages
34
Publication year
1988
Degree date
1988
School code
1512
Source
MAI 44/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542324963, 0542324962
University/institution
Touro College
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
EP14770
ProQuest document ID
303658305
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/303658305
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