Abstract/Details

Programmability of continuous and discrete network equilibria


1990 1990

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Abstract (summary)

Programming formulations of the continuous network equilibrium problem are known to exist whenever the link cost functions are differentiable and symmetric. In this dissertation several aspects of these programming formulations are considered. First, more general conditions under which network equilibrium problems are programmable are developed. In particular, it is demonstrated that the cost functions need not be differentiable, but need only satisfy certain strong forms of continuity. Second, the stability of the solutions of programming formulations of the problem are considered, in an attempt to justify the study and use of these formulations. These results are developed using a behaviorally meaningful class of adjustment processes. Finally, a discrete version of the network equilibrium problem (with symmetric, non-separable cost functions) is developed in order to motivate the use of the continuous problem.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Urban planning;
Area planning & development;
Geography;
Operations research
Classification
0999: Urban planning
0999: Area planning & development
0366: Geography
0796: Operations research
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Applied sciences
Title
Programmability of continuous and discrete network equilibria
Author
Bernstein, David Howard
Number of pages
166
Publication year
1990
Degree date
1990
School code
0175
Source
DAI-A 51/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Smith, Tony E.
University/institution
University of Pennsylvania
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9026520
ProQuest document ID
303864150
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/303864150
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