Abstract/Details

Recognition memory: The effect of speed versus accuracy instructions and study time on the mirror effect


1991 1991

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Abstract (summary)

The mirror effect is the following regularity in recognition memory. If there are two classes of stimuli, A and B, and if one class of stimuli, A is recognized better than another class of stimuli, B, then two things hold: class A is recognized better than class B as old when old, and class A is recognized better than class B as new when new.

Attention/Likelihood theory is a model of recognition memory designed to explain the mirror effect. The theory and the effect are studied using speed versus accuracy instructions and short versus long exposure of stimuli. The speed versus accuracy instructions and short versus long exposure of stimuli were used to vary the number of features sampled from stimuli. When the number of features sampled from stimuli is reduced by speed instruction or shorter exposure, recognition performance is worse than accuracy or long exposure conditions as expected. The loss in recognition performance is shown in responses to new stimuli as well as those to old stimuli as predicted by the theory. In terms of signal detection theory, all distances between underlying distributions contract when the number of features sampled from stimuli is reduced by speed instruction or shorter exposure. A unique prediction of the theory that any variable that affects recognition of the old stimuli will also affect new stimuli is supported.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Psychology;
Experiments;
Cognitive therapy
Classification
0623: Psychology
0623: Experiments
0633: Cognitive therapy
Identifier / keyword
Psychology
Title
Recognition memory: The effect of speed versus accuracy instructions and study time on the mirror effect
Author
Kim, Kisok
Number of pages
64
Publication year
1991
Degree date
1991
School code
0146
Source
DAI-B 52/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Glanzer, Murray
University/institution
New York University
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9213247
ProQuest document ID
303933852
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/303933852
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