Abstract/Details

Building shadows: Courtyards and daylight in hot-arid regions with special reference to Iraq


1991 1991

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Abstract (summary)

In recent years, a positivistic approach in daylighting studies seems to have gained a tremendous momentum. Architects who favor this approach tend to downplay the fact that quality of light cannot by easily described in scientific terms. In daylighting situations, footcandle levels are abstract figures quite apart from the phenomenal qualities of light. In the design of courtyards, the quantity of light is not as important as its quality.

Architecture should be experienced emotionally through the impact of variation in light and shadow. Any daylight study which does not respond to the effect of shadow fails to address the real subject matter in a comprehensive way. Architecture is a world of light that was brought about by means of shadow.

A realization of this design concept is evident in buildings of hot-arid regions and particularly in the work of Le Corbusier, Alvar Aalto, Louis Kahn, and Rifat Chaderji. While the focus of the dissertation is on building shadows in courtyard buildings in the region of Iraq, the discussion of the work of the above mentioned architects is used to highlight the various means they had used in manipulating the visual as well as the thermal effects of shadows.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Architecture
Classification
0729: Architecture
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts
Title
Building shadows: Courtyards and daylight in hot-arid regions with special reference to Iraq
Author
Alnoah, Abduljawad T.
Number of pages
345
Publication year
1991
Degree date
1991
School code
0175
Source
DAI-A 52/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Frascari, Marco
University/institution
University of Pennsylvania
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9211899
ProQuest document ID
303957856
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/303957856
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