Abstract/Details

Fun and power: Experience and ideology at the Magic Kingdom


1992 1992

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Abstract (summary)

The Magic Kingdom at Disneyland is a performance of Public Culture deliberately designed to appeal to culturally diverse audiences despite its highly nationalistic symbolic content. The study explores the Disneyland experience from the participants' (employees and visitors) point of view. In-depth interviews with former employees and frequent visitors, supplemented by extensive questionnaires and essays from different target populations provide diverse readings, descriptions of the Disneyland stage and personal experiences. Despite such diversity, patterns of interpretation, participation and use can be clearly discerned. Experiences which visitors describe primarily as "fun" and "feeling like a child again" have far reaching effects on individual construction of self, life-style and social and historical location. The metaphor of childhood, the organization of the stage and the engineering of the experience, however, do place constraints on the visitors' autonomy in modes of appropriation and are instrumental in the education of perception of the United States and its citizens as "authentic" leaders in the context of on-going international restructuration and emergent refeudalization.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Cultural anthropology;
American studies;
Recreation
Classification
0326: Cultural anthropology
0323: American studies
0814: Recreation
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences, California, Disneyland
Title
Fun and power: Experience and ideology at the Magic Kingdom
Author
Spinelli, Maria-Lydia
Number of pages
522
Publication year
1992
Degree date
1992
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 53/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Pi-Sunyer, Oriol
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9233165
ProQuest document ID
304010428
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304010428
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