Abstract/Details

Effects of inconsistencies in eyewitness testimony on mock-juror decision-making


1995 1995

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Abstract (summary)

In attempting to impeach eyewitnesses, attorneys often highlight inconsistencies in the eyewitness's recall. This study examined the differential impact of types of inconsistent testimony on mock-juror decisions. Each of 100 community members and 200 undergraduates viewed one of four versions of a videotaped trial in which the primary evidence against the defendant was the testimony of the eyewitness. I manipulated the types of inconsistent statements given by the eyewitness in the four versions: (1) consistent testimony, (2) information given on-the-stand but not given during the pre-trial investigation, (3) contradictions between on-the-stand and pre-trial statements, and (4) contradictions made on the witness stand. Subjects exposed to any form of inconsistent testimony were less likely to convict and found the defendant less culpable and the eyewitness less effective. These effects were larger for contradictions than for information given on the stand but not during pre-trial investigations.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social psychology;
Psychology;
Experiments;
Law
Classification
0451: Social psychology
0623: Psychology
0623: Experiments
0398: Law
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Psychology
Title
Effects of inconsistencies in eyewitness testimony on mock-juror decision-making
Author
Berman, Garrett Lee
Number of pages
60
Publication year
1995
Degree date
1995
School code
1023
Source
DAI-B 56/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Cutler, Brian L.
University/institution
Florida International University
University location
United States -- Florida
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9542309
ProQuest document ID
304296908
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304296908
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