Abstract/Details

Breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes of dietetic students in Texas


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

Breastfeeding provides optimum nutrition for infants and health benefits to mothers, and is increasingly considered the standard for infant feeding rather than the exception. Although they may influence breastfeeding practices, research regarding current and future dietitians' breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes is limited. To determine future dietitians' knowledge and attitudes toward breastfeeding, an online survey of students in Texas Didactic Programs in Dietetics (DPD) and Dietetic Internship (DI) programs (N≈1,500) was conducted. The questionnaire including demographics, knowledge, and attitude questions was developed, reviewed by experts, and pilot-tested. SPSS was used to compute descriptive statistics, independent sample t-tests, MANOVA, and ANOVA. Participants totaled 316 students (approximately 21%) and were more knowledgeable about breastfeeding benefits (average 70%) than barriers (48.1%), recommendations (44.3%), or techniques (41.8%). Respondents had positive attitudes toward breastfeeding in general (4.0±0.4) and their future professional role in encouraging breastfeeding (4.3±0.5). Results show dietetic students have positive attitudes toward breastfeeding but may need further education in breastfeeding barriers, recommendations, and techniques.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Nutrition;
Public health
Classification
0570: Nutrition
0573: Public health
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences
Title
Breastfeeding knowledge and attitudes of dietetic students in Texas
Author
Tiernan, Casey
Number of pages
91
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0925
Source
MAI 47/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109026689
Advisor
Kwon, Junehee
University/institution
Texas Woman's University
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1462907
ProQuest document ID
304323061
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304323061
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