Abstract/Details

Statistical properties of the sea scattered radar return


1996 1996

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Abstract (summary)

To investigate the scattering of microwave radiation from the wind roughened sea we constructed a unique radar system and conducted an extensive data gathering experiment. Over 3500 hours of data were collected at 2, 3.05, 5.3, 10.02, and 14 GHz and at a variety of wind speeds, relative azimuth, and incidence angles.

A simple model based on the current composite model is developed and incorporated into a simulation scheme which is used to evaluate the validity of the composite model in regards to mid-incidence angle microwave scattering. The power distributions and the velocity distributions from the simulations are compared to the empirical data in order to test the validity of the composite model. It is found that the composite model accurately predicts the qualitative behavior of the radar return for incidence angles between 30 and 50 degrees, but that other scattering mechanisms begin to influence the return at 20 and 60 degrees.

These results suggest that the postulated "missing" scatterers (scatterers not included in the composite model) do not contribute significantly to the total radar cross section for incidence angles from 30 to 50 degrees. We conclude that further progress on theoretically based scattering models must include a deeper understanding of Bragg scattering mechanisms.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Electrical engineering;
Remote sensing
Classification
0544: Electrical engineering
0799: Remote sensing
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences, Bragg scattering, remote sensing, wind
Title
Statistical properties of the sea scattered radar return
Author
Reed, Ryan
Number of pages
171
Publication year
1996
Degree date
1996
School code
0022
Source
DAI-B 57/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Long, David G.
University/institution
Brigham Young University
University location
United States -- Utah
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9613847
ProQuest document ID
304324457
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304324457
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