Abstract/Details

Secretory phospholipase A2: A candidate for the MOM1 locus, a major modifier of APC(Min)-induced intestinal neoplasia


1997 1997

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Abstract (summary)

Mutations in the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene are responsible for various familial and sporadic colorectal cancers. Min (Multiple intestinal neoplasia) mice carry a dominant mutation in the murine homolog of the Apc gene. Min mice develop multiple adenomas throughout their small and large intestine. Recent studies have identified a modifier locus, Mom1, which maps to the distal region of chromosome 4. Mom1 dramatically influences Min-induced tumor number. We report here the identification of a candidate gene for Mom1. The gene for secretory type II Phospholipase A2 (Pla2g2a) maps between D4Mit16 and D4Mit13 on the distal region of chromosome 4, the same region that contains Mom1, and displays 100% concordance between allele type and tumor susceptibility. Expression, sequencing and protein analysis revealed that Mom1 susceptible strains have a null allele for Pla2g2a and most likely lack any Pla2g2a activity. Our results suggest that Pla2g2a acts as a novel gene which modifies polyp number by altering the cellular microenvironment within the intestinal crypt.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Genetics;
Oncology
Classification
0369: Genetics
0992: Oncology
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences, Biological sciences, adenomatous polyposis coli, phospholipase A$\sb2$
Title
Secretory phospholipase A2: A candidate for the MOM1 locus, a major modifier of APC(Min)-induced intestinal neoplasia
Author
MacPhee-Pellini, Melina
Number of pages
163
Publication year
1997
Degree date
1997
School code
0272
Source
DAI-B 58/03, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780591362251, 0591362252
University/institution
Thomas Jefferson University
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9727334
ProQuest document ID
304391052
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304391052
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