Abstract/Details

Cultural differences in perceptions of effective leadership behavior


1997 1997

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Abstract (summary)

Leadership perceptions arise from a cognitive categorization process in which leadership prototypes are developed through personal experience and cultural norms. It was hypothesized that those from different societal cultures would exhibit differing scores on Hofstede's three cultural dimensions: Individualism/Collectivism (IND/COL), Uncertainty Avoidance (UA), and Power Distance (PD), and these cultural dimensions would be uniquely related to perceptions of effective leadership behavior. The sample was comprised of Caucasian and Asian Pacific American (APA) college students who completed measures of cultural dimensions and leadership. Moderating effects of acculturation level in the APA sample were also examined. Hypotheses were partially supported. Limitations of the study and future research directions are discussed.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Occupational psychology;
Minority & ethnic groups;
Sociology
Classification
0624: Occupational psychology
0631: Minority & ethnic groups
0631: Sociology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Psychology
Title
Cultural differences in perceptions of effective leadership behavior
Author
Lui, JoAnne
Number of pages
58
Publication year
1997
Degree date
1997
School code
6080
Source
MAI 36/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780591648836, 0591648830
Advisor
Maher, Karen
University/institution
California State University, Long Beach
University location
United States -- California
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1387622
ProQuest document ID
304413135
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304413135/abstract
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