Abstract/Details

Changing politics: New issue acceptance and the American way


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

I examine how political challengers help to make new political issues into common touchstones that can define mainstream political discussion, thereby increasing their chances to affect political change. I argue that the potential for political change is significantly rooted in mainstream democratic discourse and specifically in the acceptance of those issues by media, the public and elected officials. This is true to some extent for any group wishing to alter status quo distributions of rights and/or resources, but is especially important for grassroots challengers who do not already have a place of legitimated influence in the polity. I carry out my examination by scrutinizing two contemporary challenger discourses as they appear in the New York Times and USA Today—those concerning gay marriage and the living wage—as they appear in two major mainstream print media sources between 1994 and 2004. Using content analysis, existing survey data, and interview data I make the case that while gay marriage suffered many policy defeats during the time period and living wage experienced 140 policy wins, the overall impact that gay marriage had on changing American politics was much greater than that of the living wage.

Indexing (details)


Subject
American studies;
Political science;
Mass communications
Classification
0323: American studies
0615: Political science
0708: Mass communications
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Social sciences; Challenger discourses; Democracy; Discourse; Issue acceptance; Living wage; Marriage equality
Title
Changing politics: New issue acceptance and the American way
Author
Woodly, Deva R.
Number of pages
268
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0330
Source
DAI-A 69/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549930532
University/institution
The University of Chicago
University location
United States -- Illinois
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3338528
ProQuest document ID
304415555
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304415555
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