Abstract/Details

Antecedents and antisocial behavioral outcomes of deviant peer involvement in elementary school


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

This study examined the relations among predictors of involvement with deviant peers (DPI) at second grade, DPI and antisocial behavior at fourth/fifth grades, and antisocial behavior at seventh grade with 738 boys and girls. Externalizing problems at second grade predicted DPI. Social preferences, neighborhood safety, and poor parenting at second grade only indirectly predicted DPI through externalizing problems. DPI did not predict antisocial behavior at seventh grade after controlling for other factors. This finding could be due to several reasons including gender differences. DPI predicted antisocial behavior for boys, but not for girls. Boys were also more involved with deviant peers than girls. African American participants were more involved with deviant peers than European American participants, but no ethnic differences emerged in the relations among the predictors, DPI, and antisocial behavior. This study provides evidence of how DPI develops in elementary school and the effects of early DPI to antisocial behavior.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Psychotherapy
Classification
0622: Psychotherapy
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Antisocial; Antisocial behavior; Antisocial peers; Conduct disorder; Conduct problems; Delinquent peers; Deviant peers; Elementary school; Peer involvement; Peer relations
Title
Antecedents and antisocial behavioral outcomes of deviant peer involvement in elementary school
Author
Ochoa, Robert, Jr.
Number of pages
155
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0250
Source
DAI-B 69/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549496960
Advisor
McMahon, Robert J.
University/institution
University of Washington
University location
United States -- Washington
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3303399
ProQuest document ID
304440340
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304440340
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