Abstract/Details

Food: It is not just for consumption any more. Representation of food in Eastern and Western media


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

In recent years, Eastern culture has been affected greatly by the West. Numerous changes have occurred in these two societies which have had the effect of merging a number of cultural aspects of the East and West. Some traditional Eastern beliefs however, remain unchanged in the face of this Western barrage. This thesis will specifically compare how food is represented in advertising and in film for both the East and West. Food, in the West in recent years has been used more and more to represent sexual themes. Western companies, such as McDonalds have adopted advertising strategies using sex to sell food and to in general associate eating with different aspects of sexuality. These Western companies have not, to this point, used sexual themes associated with food in the East. Eastern commercials and films still tend to focus on family values and associate food with traditional deep cultural meaning. The goal of this thesis, therefore, is to indicate the cultural importance of food in the East versus the West and to cite specific examples of how these differences impact the philosophy of the societies in general.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Marketing;
Fine arts;
Sociology;
Mass communications
Classification
0338: Marketing
0357: Fine arts
0626: Sociology
0708: Mass communications
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Social sciences
Title
Food: It is not just for consumption any more. Representation of food in Eastern and Western media
Author
Supanpong, Taddao
Number of pages
21
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0198
Source
MAI 47/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549878124
University/institution
Long Island University, The Brooklyn Center
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1459606
ProQuest document ID
304463969
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304463969
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