Abstract/Details

Arms and the bishop: The Anglo-Scottish War and the northern episcopate, 1296-1357


1999 1999

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation explores the heretofore unexamined military role of the bishops of Durham and the archbishops of York during the Anglo-Scottish wars between 1296 and 1357. The study focuses on the evolution of crown policy towards the northeastern episcopate. In particular, it will be shown that it was during the reign of Edward II (1307–1327) that the practice began of nominating men with military expertise to serve as bishops in those sees. By the reign of Edward III (1327–1377), the royal government had developed a system by which potential “warrior bishops” were first trained as keepers of the privy seal. What emerges is an awareness that both the bishops of Durham and the archbishops of York, far from being militarily insignificant figures, were actually linchpins of the crown's defensive strategy against the Scots.

This study utilizes primarily printed primary sources, ranging from monastic chronicles to the calendars of close and fine rolls. Certain manuscript sources are used as well.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Middle Ages;
European history;
Religious congregations
Classification
0581: Middle Ages
0335: European history
0330: Religious congregations
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Clerics; Ecclesiastical history; England; Scotland; Warfare
Title
Arms and the bishop: The Anglo-Scottish War and the northern episcopate, 1296-1357
Author
Schwyzer, Hugo Benedict
Number of pages
327
Publication year
1999
Degree date
1999
School code
0031
Source
DAI-A 60/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
0599455039, 9780599455030
Advisor
Waugh, Scott
University/institution
University of California, Los Angeles
University location
United States -- California
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9943823
ProQuest document ID
304497304
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304497304
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