Abstract/Details

Extending dynamic scripting


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

The dynamic scripting reinforcement learning algorithm can be extended to improve the speed, effectiveness, and accessibility of learning in modern computer games without sacrificing computational efficiency. This dissertation describes three specific enhancements to the dynamic scripting algorithm that improve learning behavior and flexibility while imposing a minimal computational cost: (1) a flexible, stand alone version of dynamic scripting that allows for hierarchical dynamic scripting, (2) a method of using automatic state abstraction to increase the context sensitivity of the algorithm, and (3) an integration of this algorithm with an existing hierarchical behavior modeling architecture. The extended dynamic scripting algorithm is then examined in the three different contexts. The first results reflect a preliminary investigation based on two abstract real-time strategy games. The second set of results comes from a number of abstract tactical decision games, designed to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of extended dynamic scripting. The third set of results is generated by a series of experiments in the context of the commercial computer role-playing game Neverwinter Nights demonstrating the capabilities of the algorithm in an actual game. To conclude, a number of future research directions for investigating the effectiveness of extended dynamic scripting are described.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Computer science
Classification
0984: Computer science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Dynamic scripting; Reinforcement learning
Title
Extending dynamic scripting
Author
Ludwig, Jeremy R.
Number of pages
167
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0171
Source
DAI-B 70/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109016192
Advisor
Farley, Arthur
University/institution
University of Oregon
University location
United States -- Oregon
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3346654
ProQuest document ID
304499395
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304499395
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