Abstract/Details

Steadying the husband, uplifting the race: The Pittsburgh Urban League's promotion of black female domesticity during the Great Black Migration


1999 1999

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

This dissertation examines the impact of capitalist class transformation on African American households and community institutions during the Great Migration. The study reviews theories of rural to urban migration according to their applicability to African American migrant households. The transformation of African American households and laboring processes interacted with changes in gender and racial ideology. A historical case study of the Urban League of Pittsburgh discusses the League's racial uplift program and its implications for African American migrant households and Pittsburgh industries. The League unsuccessfully attempted to encourage black female domesticity and economic dependency on black men by encouraging wives to quit jobs and increase surplus labor within the household.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Economic history;
Black history;
Womens studies;
American history;
Home economics
Classification
0509: Economic history
0328: Black history
0453: Womens studies
0337: American history
0386: Home economics
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences, Social sciences, Black women, Domesticity, Great Black Migration, Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh, Urban League
Title
Steadying the husband, uplifting the race: The Pittsburgh Urban League's promotion of black female domesticity during the Great Black Migration
Author
Banks, Nina Elizabeth
Number of pages
247
Publication year
1999
Degree date
1999
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 60/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780599328662, 0599328665
Advisor
Flaherty, Diane
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9932292
ProQuest document ID
304515299
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304515299
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.