Abstract/Details

An empirical evaluation of the disaggregated effects of educational diversity in a national sample of law schools


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

The use of race-conscious admissions practices to achieve student diversity in academic institutions has recently been challenged. An understanding of how racial diversity in law school affects students is useful to develop administrative policies that support social and intellectual growth of students after they are admitted. A nationally-representative sample of 2,180 students from 64 accredited U.S. law schools was used to model the mechanism through which institutional diversity may influence student outcomes in a multigroup, multilevel SEM framework. Results suggest that racial heterogeneity directly and indirectly increases exchange of ideas and decreases racist/classist attitudes. The effects of racial diversity were mediated by increased contact with racially diverse peers. Results were similar for White and non-White students. This study confirms the usefulness of admissions policies that permit racial diversity in academic institutions, and imply that educators should focus on increasing intergroup contact between students.

Indexing (details)


Subject
School administration;
Psychological tests;
Higher education
Classification
0514: School administration
0632: Psychological tests
0745: Higher education
Identifier / keyword
Education; Psychology; Educational diversity; Multilevel structural equation modeling
Title
An empirical evaluation of the disaggregated effects of educational diversity in a national sample of law schools
Author
Gottfredson, Nisha C.
Number of pages
74
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0153
Source
MAI 46/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549532163
Advisor
Panter, Abigail T.
Committee member
Bauer, Daniel J.; Curran, Patrick J.
University/institution
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Department
Psychology
University location
United States -- North Carolina
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1452900
ProQuest document ID
304531750
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304531750
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