Abstract/Details

Low -latency anonymity systems: Statistical attacks and new applications


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

In this dissertation, we study low-latency anonymity protocols and systems. Such systems enable anonymous communication where latency is not tolerated well, such as browsing the web, but also introduce new vulnerabilities not present in systems that hide timing information. We examine one such vulnerability, the profiling attack, as well as possible defenses to such an attack. We also examine the feasibility of using low-latency anonymity techniques to support a new application, Voice over IP (VoIP). First, we show that profiling attacks on low-latency anonymity systems are feasible. The attack we study is based upon pre-constructing profiles of communication and identifying the sender of encrypted, anonymized traffic on the basis of these profiles. Second, we present results from a large-scale measurement study and the application of this attack to the measured data. These results indicate that profiling is practical across sets of thousands of possible initiators and that such profiles remain valid for weeks at a time. Third, we evaluate defenses against the profiling attack and their effects upon system performance. We then demonstrate the feasibility of supporting anonymous VoIP; specifically, we show supporting measurement data and outline the changes current anonymity systems would require to carry such traffic. We also show how such systems are potentially more vulnerable to known attacks and start to examine the tradeoffs between VoIP performance and anonymity inherent in such systems.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Computer science
Classification
0984: Computer science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences, Anonymous communication, Low-latency, Voice over IP
Title
Low -latency anonymity systems: Statistical attacks and new applications
Author
Liberatore, Marc D.
Number of pages
117
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 69/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549664062
Advisor
Levine, Brian
Committee member
Corner, Mark; Goeckel, Dennis; Jensen, David
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Computer Science
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3315526
ProQuest document ID
304566748
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304566748
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