Abstract/Details

Molecular modeling and Langevin dynamics simulations of viral genome packaging and DS-DNA translocation


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

Over recent decades, molecular biology has been transformed by the progression towards a more physical understanding of biological macromolecules, such that familiar biochemical behavior can be understood in terms of individual macromolecular structure. Such physical insight now guides modern approaches to biotechnology and fundamental biology. Langevin dynamics simulations offer the opportunity to build upon static structural models by treating macromolecules as dynamic entities. Results will be presented of the application of Langevin dynamics simulations to viral genome packaging and voltage-induced polyelectrolyte translocation. An overview will be given demonstrating how Langevin dynamics, taken together with remarkable experimental efforts, has revealed the central importance of DNA/RNA dynamics in each of these phenomena. Based on the success of these studies, it is suggested that Langevin dynamics, in coordination with experimental efforts, represents a powerful tool for improving the fundamental understanding of various phenomena of biological and biotechnological import.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Polymer chemistry
Classification
0495: Polymer chemistry
Identifier / keyword
Pure sciences; DNA translocation; Polyelectrolyte translocation; Viral genome packaging
Title
Molecular modeling and Langevin dynamics simulations of viral genome packaging and DS-DNA translocation
Author
Forrey, Christopher
Number of pages
143
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 69/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549915409
Advisor
Muthukumar, Murugappan
Committee member
Emrick, Todd S.; Machta, Jonathan
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Polymer Science & Engineering
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3336954
ProQuest document ID
304567086
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304567086
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