Abstract/Details

Trophic ecology of the slender snipe eel, <i>Nemichthys scolopaceus</i> (Anguilliformes: Nemichthyidae)


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

Roughly 92% of the total volume of Earth's oceans is considered deep sea. The eel species, Nemichthys scolopaceus, inhabits these waters, and little is known of its diet, its place within pelagic food webs, and its overall ecological impact. In this study we quantitatively estimate the abundance, feeding and predation impact of this key predator. Specimens were collected in 2004 along Georges Bank as part of the Census of Marine Life Gulf of Maine project. Gut contents were analyzed, revealing thirteen prey types, primarily euphausiids and decapod crustaceans. Other potential prey (i.e. fishes) were absent from the diet, suggesting a fairly selective feeding preference. Of the 85 fish species collected, N. scolopaceus ranked second in abundance and first in total fish biomass. Therefore, this species is not only a large biomass contributor, but perhaps cycles a great deal of macrocrustacean carbon through deep-pelagic fishes in this, and likely other, ecosystems.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Ecology;
Aquaculture;
Fish production
Classification
0329: Ecology
0792: Aquaculture
0792: Fish production
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences
Title
Trophic ecology of the slender snipe eel, <i>Nemichthys scolopaceus</i> (Anguilliformes: Nemichthyidae)
Author
Feagans, Jennifer N.
Number of pages
30
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0119
Source
MAI 46/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549509806
Advisor
Sutton, Tracey
University/institution
Florida Atlantic University
University location
United States -- Florida
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1452623
ProQuest document ID
304567374
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304567374
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