Abstract/Details

Escaping carbon lock-in


1999 1999

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Abstract (summary)

The issue of climate change, induced by anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions, is major policy concern for nations, international organizations and global society in general. The environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis, when applied to carbon dioxide emissions, implies that increasing economic growth may lead to lower national emissions after a characteristic income level is passed. The research here indicates that this hypothesis does not hold for carbon dioxide emissions. While a transition to decreasing emissions was identified in a subset of technologically advanced countries, it correlated with the, political and economic changes that followed the oil crises of the 1970s. When evaluated from a technological and institutional perspective, the climate problem can be viewed as a result of carbon lock-in. Reframing the issue in this way allows the development of policies that address the process of technological and institutional change in a coherent manner. Climate change mitigation would be beneficially attacked with “policy packages” that develop “nurse” markets for development of carbon-free technologies.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Economics;
International law;
International relations;
Business community
Classification
0501: Economics
0616: International law
0616: International relations
0310: Business community
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences, Carbon lock-in, Climate change, Complexity, Innovation, Technology
Title
Escaping carbon lock-in
Author
Unruh, Gregory Charles
Number of pages
222
Publication year
1999
Degree date
1999
School code
0930
Source
DAI-A 60/04, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780599270558, 0599270551
University/institution
Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (Tufts University)
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9927335
ProQuest document ID
304573134
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304573134
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