Abstract/Details

Dyadic parenting and children's externalizing symptoms


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

This study explored dyadic parenting styles and their association with externalizing behavior symptoms among 79 working-class White families with children in first grade. Exploratory cluster analysis was used to create a typology of parenting at the dyadic level, reflecting the parental warmth, overreactivity and laxness of both mothers and fathers in two-parent families. Three distinct groups emerged: Positive Parenting, Inconsistent Parenting and Negative Parenting couples. Results indicated that dyadic parenting styles were related to teacher-reported externalizing symptoms for boys, but not for girls. Findings also revealed that the relationship between parenting styles and externalizing behavior depended on parent and child gender and also on parents' relative involvement. Overall results support the hypothesis that having one effective parent can "buffer" the impact of a less effective parent, and that having two negative parents was associated with the highest degree of behavior problems in children.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social psychology;
Clinical psychology;
Individual & family studies
Classification
0451: Social psychology
0622: Clinical psychology
0628: Individual & family studies
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Psychology; Children; Externalizing; Parenting
Title
Dyadic parenting and children's externalizing symptoms
Author
Meteyer, Karen B.
Number of pages
114
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 69/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549915102
Advisor
Perry-Jenkins, Maureen
Committee member
Harvey, Elizabeth; Janoff-Bulman, Ronnie; Lundquist, Jennifer
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Psychology
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3336924
ProQuest document ID
304578874
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304578874
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