Abstract/Details

Permeating boundaries: The meaning of “nature” and “American”


2000 2000

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Abstract (summary)

American political thought is unusual in that the conception of “nature” is overtly important as well as silently embedded in the frame of reference of its practitioners. The conception of nature is evident in the national narrative around membership and property as well as in pastoral political resistance. It is my basic thesis that this attitude toward nature contributes not only to a specific kind of public policy decision concerning the allocation of natural resources, but also maintains a presupposition of the ideal American citizen as Anglo and male. I have ventured into the culture of the Southwestern Latinos, particularly but not exclusively the Hispanos of northern New Mexico and Chicano/Chicanas in order to find an alternative view of nature and an alternative perspective on the conception of nature in the United States. In the end I find the most problematic aspects of the conception of nature in traditional American political thought are (1) the reliance on ideological sameness in the that ignores real, material difference; (2) the commodification of nature and (3) the exclusion of human naturalness from the political debate.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Political science;
American studies;
Environmental science
Classification
0615: Political science
0323: American studies
0768: Environmental science
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences, Social sciences, Commodification, Human naturalness, Latinos, Nature, Public policy
Title
Permeating boundaries: The meaning of “nature” and “American”
Author
Moulton, Charlene Deaun
Number of pages
156
Publication year
2000
Degree date
2000
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 61/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780599645875, 0599645873
Advisor
King, Jerome B.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9960777
ProQuest document ID
304606339
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304606339
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