Abstract/Details

An energy scalable computational array for energy harvesting sensors


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

Harvesting energy from environmental sources can extend the lifetime of wireless sensor network nodes beyond the limits of battery technology. However, the output power from an energy harvester is highly variable. This dissertation describes a domain-specific computational array which maximizes sensor availability by matching system power consumption to the obtainable scavenged energy through power scalable approximate signal processing. The array consists of distributed arithmetic (DA)-based functional units coupled with an island-style reconfigurable interconnection network. Each functional unit is capable of computing a set of linear and nonlinear core signal processing functions in an area efficient manner, which also minimizes leakage power. Sensor DSP applications, such as Finite-Impulse Response (FIR) filters, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), rectangular-to-polar conversion, polar-to-rectangular conversion, and Taylor polynomial evaluation, are mapped onto the array through the reconfigurable interconnect structure. A low power sensor DSP chip of a 4x4 array has been designed and implemented to validate our architecture concepts and circuit techniques. The chip was fabricated in 0.25μm CMOS technology.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Electrical engineering;
Computer science
Classification
0544: Electrical engineering
0984: Computer science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Distributed arithmetic; Energy harvesting; Energy-scalable; FPGA; Low-power; Reconfigurable; Sensor DSP
Title
An energy scalable computational array for energy harvesting sensors
Author
Guo, Liping
Number of pages
131
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0029
Source
DAI-B 69/09, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549854746
Advisor
Amirtharajah, Raj
University/institution
University of California, Davis
University location
United States -- California
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3329619
ProQuest document ID
304645370
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304645370
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