Abstract/Details

Emotional and cognitive sources of retrospective memory bias


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

This longitudinal study examined retrospective memory bias and the contributions of current state of distress and self-enhancement to recall bias. Sixty-nine students at a university in New York City were asked to complete a weekly web-based survey of life events throughout their four years of study. At the end of the four years, they were asked to recall the total number of events which they had endorsed during the study. In general, participants tended to under-estimate the number of events they had experienced. Recall for potentially traumatic events (PTEs) was relatively accurate but there was still some variability in the recalled number of events. Our study found the recall bias was not random and that higher levels of distress at the time of recall were associated with a higher number of recalled PTEs and, therefore, a reduction in the under-estimation bias. However, we also found a significant interaction between distress and self enhancement. Participants with higher levels of distress and higher levels of self-enhancement recalled fewer numbers of PTEs when compared to their less self-enhancing peers. The implications for research and theory development are discussed.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Cognitive therapy;
Memory;
Stress;
College students;
Psychological tests
Classification
0633: Cognitive therapy
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Cognitive; Emotional sources; Retrospective memory bias; Self-enhancement
Title
Emotional and cognitive sources of retrospective memory bias
Author
Lalande, Kathleen M.
Number of pages
61
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0054
Source
DAI-B 68/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549339267
Advisor
Bonanno, George A.
University/institution
Columbia University
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3290517
ProQuest document ID
304652503
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304652503
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