Abstract/Details

A physically-based approach for lens flare simulation


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

In this thesis, we present a physically-based method for the computer graphics simulation of lens flare phenomena in photographic lenses. The proposed method can be used to render lens flares from nearly all types of lenses regardless of optical construction.

The method described in this thesis utilizes the photon mapping technique (Jensen, 2001) to simulate the flow of light within the lens, and captures the visual effects of internal reflections and scattering within (and between) the optical elements. The elements of the lens can be moved, as in a zoom lens, and the simulated lens flare will be modified accurately. Similarly, changes to the focus of the lens will also affect the lens flare, as would be expected in a real camera.

The techniques described can be incorporated into an existing rendering engine without interfering with image generation. All new effects produced can be added upon existing output, and such an overlay maintains physical correctness as lens flares are produced through light paths not previously considered. We present images produced with our technique alongside unoptimized rendering times. At the conclusion of the thesis, we outline the limitations of our method and offer approaches to accelerate the simulation, as well as propose future work in this area.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Optics;
Computer science
Classification
0752: Optics
0984: Computer science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Pure sciences
Title
A physically-based approach for lens flare simulation
Author
Keshmirian, Arash
Number of pages
55
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0033
Source
MAI 46/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549438335
Advisor
Jensen, Henrik Wann
Committee member
Kriegman, David; Zwicker, Mathias
University/institution
University of California, San Diego
Department
Computer Science and Engineering
University location
United States -- California
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1451802
ProQuest document ID
304658692
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304658692
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