Abstract/Details

Talking games: An empirical study of speech -based cursor control mechanisms


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

This document describes a study of speech-based cursor control mechanisms along with a new proposed approach called NameTags. This research is intended to provide empirical user data to inform the design of future systems where one or more of the following conditions are present: real-time demands, very small targets, and moving targets. One such application of this research is in the area of video games, where subjects are often required to make quick selections on numerous small, moving objects. These findings also have implications for physically impaired subjects whose primary or only control modality is speech.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Computer science
Classification
0984: Computer science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Automatic speech recognition; Cursor control; Human factors; Human-computer interaction; Speech interfaces; Speech-based cursor control; Usability; Video games
Title
Talking games: An empirical study of speech -based cursor control mechanisms
Author
Thornton, David
Number of pages
86
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0012
Source
DAI-B 69/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549857365
Advisor
Gilbert, Juan
University/institution
Auburn University
University location
United States -- Alabama
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3333160
ProQuest document ID
304689600
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304689600
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