Abstract/Details

Signal formulation, segmentation, and lesion volume estimation in magnetic resonance images


2001 2001

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Abstract (summary)

In this dissertation we present a new approach to estimate the volume of ischermic stroke lesions using magnetic resonance imagery (MRI). The approach is hierarchical, regularized, and guided by statistical theory, resulting in a confidence map for the lesion itself and a confidence interval for the lesion volume. We test the procedure on synthetic data and real MRI, with estimates to within 6% of the volumes from physicians' hand segmentations. These results compare favorably to those from other Bayesian-based methods. Also, we present a formulation of the free induction decay signal for several MR pulse sequences, which allow for the classification of distinct tissue types in MRI.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Statistics;
Biomedical research;
Radiology
Classification
0463: Statistics
0541: Biomedical research
0574: Radiology
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Applied sciences; Pure sciences; Image segmentation; Magnetic resonance images; Signal formulation; Volume estimation
Title
Signal formulation, segmentation, and lesion volume estimation in magnetic resonance images
Author
Stein, Benjamin Reece
Number of pages
96
Publication year
2001
Degree date
2001
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 62/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780493393667, 0493393668
Advisor
Horowitz, Joseph
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3027260
ProQuest document ID
304699719
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304699719
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