Abstract/Details

Perceptions of Massachusetts family and consumer sciences education professionals regarding the importance and use of the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education in Massachusetts


2001 2001

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Abstract (summary)

The purpose of this study was to facilitate informed decision-making in the development of a curriculum guide for Massachusetts family and consumer sciences education programs by gathering new knowledge related to the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education (National Association of State Administrators of Family and Consumer Sciences·Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States [NASAFACS·V-TECS], 1998). The three goals of this study were: (1) to determine the perceived importance of each of the 16 areas of study of the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education (NASAFACS·V-TECS, 1998) in meeting the national family and consumer sciences education vision, (2) to determine the perceived importance of each of the 86 content standards of the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education (NASAFACS·V-TECS, 1998) in meeting the national family and consumer sciences education vision, and (3) to determine how often each content standard is taught in local family and consumer sciences education programs in Massachusetts. The national vision states that: “Family and Consumer Sciences Education empowers individuals and families across the life span to manage the challenges of living in a diverse global society. Our unique focus is on families, work, and their interrelationships” (NASAFACS·V-TECS, 1998, p. 2).

The descriptive survey involved data collection from a national population of head state administrators of family and consumer sciences and the population of Massachusetts family and consumer sciences education professionals. The study found that whereas the question asked respondents to identify six areas of study, the results indicated that seven areas of study were perceived as distinctly more important. Six of the seven family and consumer sciences education areas of study were selected as more important by both the head state administrators and the Massachusetts professionals. These areas of study were: parenting; interpersonal relations; human development; family; career, community, and family connections; and nutrition and wellness. The Massachusetts professionals included the early childhood, education, and services as one of the seven more important areas of study, whereas the head state administrators selected the consumer and family resources as one of the seven more important areas of study.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Home economics education
Classification
0278: Home economics education
Identifier / keyword
Education; Education professionals; Family and consumer sciences; Massachusetts; National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education
Title
Perceptions of Massachusetts family and consumer sciences education professionals regarding the importance and use of the National Standards for Family and Consumer Sciences Education in Massachusetts
Author
Pullen, Jo Ann
Number of pages
160
Publication year
2001
Degree date
2001
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 62/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780493393001, 0493393005
Advisor
Thuemmel, William L.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ed.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3027243
ProQuest document ID
304700301
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304700301
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