Abstract/Details

Cognition in locomotion: Infants' executive functioning in goal -directed locomotor tasks


2001 2001

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

Adaptive locomotor strategies such as using a banister and executing a detour require higher-level cognitive processes. I present two sets of studies which examine the role of executive functions such as means/ends coordination, planning, and inhibition in adaptive locomotion. In two locomotor versions of Piaget's classic A-not-B task, 13-month-old walking infants inhibited a prepotent response under low task demands but perseverated under increased task demands. Results belie existing explanations for infant perseveration based on incomplete mental representations, motor habits, or memory demands. Evidence supports a cognitive capacity theory, where infants' performance depends on allocation of cognitive and attentional resources. In two locomotor versions of a tool-use task, 16-month-old toddlers recognized that a novel handrail augmented their balance capabilities for walking over narrow bridges. Their behavioral adaptations reflect the ability to integrate external and individual factors into a complete multi-step strategy. Results from both sets of studies indicate that the cognitive processes implicated in locomotion are graded rather than all or none.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Developmental psychology;
Cognitive therapy
Classification
0620: Developmental psychology
0633: Cognitive therapy
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Cognition; Executive functioning; Goal-directed; Infants; Locomotion
Title
Cognition in locomotion: Infants' executive functioning in goal -directed locomotor tasks
Author
Berger, Sarah Ellen
Number of pages
118
Publication year
2001
Degree date
2001
School code
0146
Source
DAI-B 61/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780493056098, 0493056092
Advisor
Adolph, Karen E.
University/institution
New York University
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
9997439
ProQuest document ID
304707621
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304707621
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.