Abstract/Details

Free will versus predestination in “Life is a Dream” and “Damned for Despair”


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

In the middle of the seventeenth century, as Spain goes through a bad crisis in every realm, there is also a flourishing in the literary arts thus, magnifying a period in time filled with contrasts such as the Baroque. Based on their strong doctrine foundation, Pedro Calderon de la Barca as well as Tirso de Molina, emphasize the importance of free will in their respective plays with means of putting an end to different ideologies and theological controversies. In an environment of intolerance towards paganism, the absolutist monarchy intends spiritual unification under the banner of an orthodox Catholicism. Therefore, the church noticeably influences the Baroque theater since this great source plays an important role in promoting the catholic faith. However, more than a solution, the theater of Calderon and Tirso lead to insoluble philosophical questions.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Romance literature;
Theater
Classification
0313: Romance literature
0465: Theater
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Language, literature and linguistics; Calderon de la Barca, Pedro; Molina, Tirso de; Spain
Title
Free will versus predestination in “Life is a Dream” and “Damned for Despair”
Author
Pineda, Maria de Lourdes
Number of pages
64
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
6050
Source
MAI 46/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549126300
University/institution
California State University, Fresno
University location
United States -- California
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
Spanish
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1446301
ProQuest document ID
304707954
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304707954
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