Abstract/Details

Motivating African American women to become better advocates for their health


2007 2007

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

Statistics suggest that African American women, particularly those of lower socioeconomic status, have the greatest disparities in health status and outcomes when compared to other races and the male gender. As a result of poor health, their quality of life and productivity in society are compromised. In an effort to motivate African American women to become better advocates for their own health, a community-based health intervention program is proposed. This health program is primarily based on a critical review of the literature of existing programs combined with a qualitative analysis of the content and outcome of two women's health forums that the author previously designed and implemented. This health program highlights how one's motivation can be a catalyst to changing one's health-seeking behaviors. The dissertation concludes with a proposition of how to evaluate the effectiveness of this proposed health program.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Black studies;
Public health;
Clinical psychology;
Motivation;
African Americans
Classification
0325: Black studies
0573: Public health
0622: Clinical psychology
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Social sciences; Psychology; African American women; African-American; Bio-psycho-social-spiritual; Community intervention; Health; Health advocacy; Health program; Motivation; Women
Title
Motivating African American women to become better advocates for their health
Author
Haynes, Desiree F.
Number of pages
128
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
1128
Source
DAI-B 69/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549870647
Advisor
Marczyk, Geoffrey
University/institution
Widener University, Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Psy.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3334228
ProQuest document ID
304719594
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304719594
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.