Abstract/Details

The dual credit program: Measuring the effectiveness on students' transition from high school to college


2007 2007

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

The Dual Credit Program has been defined for the purpose of this research as an articulated program for high school students to earn college credit while enrolled in high school. Dual credit programs have evolved swiftly throughout the nation, providing an avenue for early access to college. Thousands of high school students take full advantage of this program of service, and many have reported that the program has positive impacts. However, outcome measures of the program remain relatively untested, particularly within the four colleges of the Community College District of the Southwest. This research evaluated the program's effectiveness as it relates to students successfully transitioning from high school to college. Dual credit programs offer numerous benefits to colleges, high schools, teachers, and more importantly students, as reported throughout this study. A major benefit to sponsoring colleges is the potential for recruitment. By exposing students to "early college", research shows that students are realizing their college potential and in many cases choosing the sponsoring colleges to make seamless transitions.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Community colleges
Classification
0275: Community colleges
Identifier / keyword
Education; College transition; Dual credit; High school
Title
The dual credit program: Measuring the effectiveness on students' transition from high school to college
Author
Crockett-Bell, Sharon Ann
Number of pages
94
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
1351
Source
DAI-A 68/09, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549172444
Advisor
Campbell, Kathryn
Committee member
Adkins, Mac; Wellington, Eric
University/institution
Capella University
Department
School of Education
University location
United States -- Minnesota
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3277657
ProQuest document ID
304720362
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304720362
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.