Abstract/Details

Governing ourselves before governing others: An investigation of authentic leadership


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

Authentic leadership is becoming a prevalent focus area for new thinking in leadership after the colossal corporate failures in leadership experienced at the beginning of this century. To this end, authenticity in leadership has been proposed as the fundamental root construct of all positive psychology-based forms of leadership such as transformational and servant. This study proposes that authenticity is constitutive to all effective antecedents to leadership, follower-ship, and highly effective teams. As such, authenticity is a hegemonic core construct that is foundational to what makes humans, and ultimately entire organizations, sustainable in their effectiveness. Increasing authenticity within leaders fosters increasing effectiveness of followers through modeling as well increased states of trust between the leader and follower. Trust, in this sense, is the lubrication for all highly effective systems of human activities whatever they might be.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Organizational behavior;
Organization theory;
Leadership;
Studies
Classification
0454: Management
0703: Organizational behavior
0703: Organization theory
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Authentic leadership; Authenticity; Governing; Leadership; Organizations; Teams; Trust
Title
Governing ourselves before governing others: An investigation of authentic leadership
Author
Cameron, Robert K.
Number of pages
228
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
1351
Source
DAI-A 68/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549275787
Advisor
Whitlock, John L.
Committee member
Cammann, Cortlandt; Fairholm, Matthew R.
University/institution
Capella University
Department
School of Business
University location
United States -- Minnesota
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3283999
ProQuest document ID
304723108
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304723108
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