Abstract/Details

“We are all contaminated”: Lead poisoning and urban environmental politics in Uruguay


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

The dissertation analyzes the emergence of lead contamination in Uruguay as a new political issue at the turn of the millennium. It focuses attention on the formation of an environmental justice movement against lead, and the deployment and interventions of state agencies and professional expertise. As neoliberal restructuring gradually shifted the economy from agro-industry to services over the past two decades, the Uruguayan state and society engaged in a process of "greening" through the proliferation of institutions, laws, discourses and political movements oriented around nature and the environment. The dissertation situates the lead issue between neoliberal fragmentation and social exclusion, on the one hand, and this broader societal "greening" process on the other. It analyzes the origins, dynamics and tensions of neoliberal nature and grassroots environmentalism in Uruguay. The research provides a unique window into the often-neglected environmental dimensions of urban social exclusion, the roots of collective action, and the development and trajectory of emergent ideologies in a little-studied country struggling with a prolonged decline from its once-proud status as the "Switzerland" of South America.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Cultural anthropology;
Political science;
Environmental science
Classification
0326: Cultural anthropology
0615: Political science
0768: Environmental science
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Social sciences; Environmental politics; Lead poisoning; Squatter settlements; Urban politics; Uruguay
Title
“We are all contaminated”: Lead poisoning and urban environmental politics in Uruguay
Author
Renfrew, Daniel
Number of pages
381
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0792
Source
DAI-A 68/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549158141
Advisor
Ferradas, Carmen A.
Committee member
Appelbaum, Nancy; Holmes, Douglas R.; Wilson, Thomas M.
University/institution
State University of New York at Binghamton
Department
Anthropology
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3274958
ProQuest document ID
304724275
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304724275
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