Abstract/Details

The relationship between minority statuses and prejudice


2007 2007

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

It is important to explore prejudice to understand and learn how to decrease it. There is a central belief that “personal knowledge reduces prejudice.” Does a person who has personal knowledge of prejudice, for example, those of minority status have less prejudice towards others? There has been considerable research on the prejudice that the majority might feel towards minorities but there is limited research on minorities’ prejudice towards others. The current study focuses on the relationship between a person of self-perceived minority statuses and her or his feelings of prejudice towards others (e.g. minorities and mainstream).

Previous research had found a positive correlation between fundamentalism and prejudice. This study investigated that relationship and a positive correlation was found. Another aspect that has been studied in previous research, dealing with prejudice and self reports, is social desirability. This study investigated the relationship between social desirability and multiple minority statuses and no statistical significance was found.

An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was utilized to investigate the relationship between multiple minority statuses and prejudice. The analysis showed no statistical significance on the relationship between multiple minority statuses and prejudice.

There is still a lot about prejudice that remains unknown. This area of research should be investigated further to better understand minority prejudice, which in turn might lead us to overcome its negative effects.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Psychotherapy;
Minority & ethnic groups;
Prejudice
Classification
0622: Psychotherapy
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Disability; Ethnicity; Gender; Minority; Prejudice; Sexual orientation; Statuses
Title
The relationship between minority statuses and prejudice
Author
Veve, Mia
Number of pages
87
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0803
Source
DAI-B 68/09, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549234463
Advisor
Davenport, Donna S.
University/institution
Texas A&M University
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3281165
ProQuest document ID
304731358
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304731358
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.