Abstract/Details

The comparative similarities of the psychocultural roots of genocide and war


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

This study investigated the comparative similarities between war and genocide, the hypothesis being that there are similarities. The participants included 138 students from the University Central Oklahoma general psychology pool. These were both male and female, with an average age of 21. A 2 x 3 between-within subjects design was used with a test-retest order. Two questionnaires were given to each of the 3 groups in random orders. Each questionnaire had 25 questions, answered on an 8-point Likert Scale. A paired samples t-test was administered to find significance between parallel questions. Of the 25, 10 were found to support the hypothesis that there will be differences in rating for a number of items on questionnaires when statements with the only difference being the two terms war and genocide; the remaining 15 questions were found to have significant differences. This research will hopefully be useful for further replication and future research on similar topics.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Cultural anthropology;
Social psychology;
Sociology
Classification
0326: Cultural anthropology
0451: Social psychology
0626: Sociology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Psychology; Aggression; Attrition; Genocide; Hate; Massacres; War
Title
The comparative similarities of the psychocultural roots of genocide and war
Author
Collins, Kimberly
Number of pages
58
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0503
Source
MAI 46/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549389040
Advisor
Frederickson, William
Committee member
Johnson, William; Rupp, Gabe
University/institution
University of Central Oklahoma
Department
Education & Professional studies
University location
United States -- Oklahoma
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1450093
ProQuest document ID
304758798
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304758798
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