Abstract/Details

Pair formation in CS1: Self -selection vs random pairing


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

Attrition in Computer Science education is at its highest level in the last 20 years. Many researchers are searching for practices to decrease the attrition rate nationwide. Pair programming has been borrowed from industry and placed in today's computer science academic environment. Many studies have shown that pair programming increases students' confidence levels and aids in the retention of those students that have selected computer science as their academic major.

This research builds on this premise and investigates the effects of self-selection and random methods of pair formation. These methods of pair formation were used in beginning computer science courses at a historically black college and university (HBCU) to statistically demonstrate that students prefer to self-select their partner. Honoring this preference aids in the students overall satisfaction with beginning CS courses therefore decreasing the students possibility of changing their academic major. Data will show that in a CS1 course, the election to implement random or self-selection pair formation is trivial and students will perform equally whether the pairs are assigned or self-selected, however self-selection aids in the satisfaction of a student and therefore impacts their decision to retain computer science as their major.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Curricula;
Teaching;
Computer science
Classification
0727: Curricula
0727: Teaching
0984: Computer science
Identifier / keyword
Education; Applied sciences; Pair formation; Pair programming; Self-selection
Title
Pair formation in CS1: Self -selection vs random pairing
Author
Williams, Aurelia T.
Number of pages
109
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0483
Source
DAI-B 68/09, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549244769
Advisor
Bergin, Joseph
University/institution
Pace University
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
D.P.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3281992
ProQuest document ID
304759864
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304759864
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