Abstract/Details

Navigating organizational change: Strategic management in law enforcement


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

Successful police executives must continually assess their department's ability to meet the needs of the public, demonstrate fiscal responsibility, and work with internal personnel and external stakeholders to maintain an adaptive organizational culture.

In order for police agencies to sustain organizational growth capable of adapting to a face-paced world, the role of guiding the agency toward organizational renewal is the responsibility of all managers. Therefore, the most immediate strategic step is to understand the leadership capabilities of the management staff and their perceptions of the organization's culture. Once police executives have an understanding of their management staffs leadership capabilities a framework can be established to advance the organization and develop more adaptable strategies in minimizing threats to the organization as well as capitalizing on opportunities. This study identified the dominant leadership characteristics of police managers within various police agencies and their perceptions of the organizational culture. This research provides a foundation for leadership development and offers policy considerations when implementing organizational change.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Public administration;
Criminology;
Organizational behavior;
Organization theory
Classification
0617: Public administration
0627: Criminology
0703: Organizational behavior
0703: Organization theory
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Law enforcement; Organizational change; Police; Strategic management
Title
Navigating organizational change: Strategic management in law enforcement
Author
Charrier, Kim
Number of pages
198
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0391
Source
DAI-A 68/03, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Wiggall, Richard
University/institution
Northern Arizona University
University location
United States -- Arizona
Degree
Ed.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3257724
ProQuest document ID
304763287
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304763287
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